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going on today. this is "mad money high noon." we've been listening all morning to ben bernanke's testimony. they're taking a break and we're monitoring it and return to it if need be. let's go to steve liesman. what do you think is happening here? >> the main thing to note is the thing he said again that the fed will remain exceptionally low for an extended period. there were questions about given what happened to the discount rate and given a very confusing financing program that they announced yesterday which is sort of a drain on liquidity. the main thing is bernanke steps forward and says we will remain exceptional, there are a lot of games and dancing going on about regulatory reform and games and dancing going on about some of the fed anger and the populist anger about where you go from here on deficits and that, but i don't think any of that is as substantial, jimmy, as the chairman saying here's the policy. the policy is what it was in january. one other note i would make, i thought his comments on the recovery were tentative and more on the one hand and on the other ha
because of the greece situation, and also because fed chief ben bernanke is saying that they're going to look into the swaps specifically with goldman. so that is an issue, of course, as well. i want to bring in brian shactman who has been down here all day and tracking all of this action. a very big day, indeed, brian. let's talk about the economic situation and how the jobless claims are affecting this market. >> the truth is when americans woke up today, we will have a negative open because of europe. the concerns over greece, of course, made the euro softer and the dollar strengthen. we've had a real correlation with the dollar and the euro in eshgsz kitties and jobless claims hit and it was muted and boom, we bottomed out and they were a concern today and we have traders saying this is a 70% greece and the others is saying 100% about jobs. a lot of earnings and there's a big, big deal that we want to talk about today as well. >> coca-cola enterprises. this had been to some extent, somewhat expected within the m&a community. when you see a deal like this a multibillion deal, one w
, will they or won't they? the bailout chatter for greece intensifies. >> and here in the united states, ben bernanke will set out the fed's exit plan today but will likely make jobs clear, we'll still be in the car for some time to come. >> and welcome to "worldwide exchange." i'm christine tan in singapore where it's 5:00 p.m. in the city. let's get a view of where the asian markets have closed today. a lot of hopes pengd on the european union. they might come up with a plan to bail out greece. the nikkei 225 is up marginally. toyota continues to be focused. that stock climbing despite anal announcement that it's recalling another set of cars. the shanghai market up more than 1%. a lot of positive comments out in the country about strong import data and export data and that's helping to lift sentiment in china. the kos pit is moving up flat. people and investors are staying on the sidelines. the bombay sensex is trading down 0.5% and the aussie market is pretty much flat, up 0.2%. the ftse cnbc global 300 up 8 points, 4,243. ross, good to see you. >> hey, christine. we're very much focused on the w
on a bailout for the debt-strapped country. >>> on exit strategy, ben bernanke unveiling his plan for the fed's next move. and the house of mouse, disney posting strong quarterly results and investors are responding. a cnbc exclusive with ceo bob ieger, "squawk box" begins right now. >> good morning, everybody. welcome to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick. joe and carl are out today. steve liesman is spending the week on set with me and this morning we are joined by "fortune" magazine editor andy soerwer. >> good to be here. >> meantime, wall street is bracing for a winter storm this morning as the second snowstorm in a week descend eds on new york. washington, philadelphia, they are expected to be hit and hit hard. the federal government in washington is closed for a third straight day at an estimated cost of $100 million in lust productivity. government offices in boston, baltimore and philadelphia all announcing that they will be closed. congress, by the way, is canceling votes and rescheduling hearings. the united nations headquarters in new york city shutting down schools all th
, fed chairman ben bernanke has returned to capitol hill this morning. and investors are looking for more clues on the central bank's next move. and the markets at this hour have u.s. equity futures under a bit of pressure after yesterday's rebound as "squawk box" begins right now. >> welcome to "squawk box" right here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with joe kernen at the cnbc world headquarters. carl is in washington this morning where president obama is hosting a televised health care summit. we'll have more from carl on that story. but joe, that's not the only news in washington today. >> no, it's not. we may pipe in that music with carl down there and he'll be looking good. he'll have his jacket on. >> he always looks good. >> yes, he does. also in washington, carl is there, but also this other guys that's going to show up. that's not really what all the scuttlebutt is going to be about down there. it's about carl. but ben bernanke will come back and testify on the hill today. yesterday he pledged to continue record low interest rates for, in his words, an extended period. >>
much, sharon. we're not getting as much volatility today as yesterday although ben bernanke's tax did get a little movement. if you look at two-year yield it's slightly elevated and you look at the curve it's know changed. there's a potential for an exit strategy as depicted by that text. if you look at the next chart, indeed the euro versus the dollar has been mostly down, but it is bouncing back a bit especially in the last hour or so, keeping up with the headlines and some of those headlines, hey, the checks didn't have a good day and they sold an additional 150 million u.s. equivalent of their 15 year. they wanted to sell more, but portugal had better luck selling u.s. equipment of the 4 billion of ten-year note and let's hop across the pond and rebecca me ham. >> let's take a check of what's happening in europe and it's all about greece. no surprise there and we check on the fotse, the cac and the dax. 2.4% higher for greek eiquities today. we know we've had the european finance chiefsi having a conference call today. the ecb governing body is having a call tonight and tomorrow a
't paying attention. my lead of the bernanke speech was discount rate to be hiked. my lead on the minutes was -- >> it sounds like -- >> let me finish, melissa, just be clear, my sources are telling me in the wake of this that the concept there's another bit to come is not necessarily true. they may stop here. so the idea that somehow they're just beginning this process of going back to 100 over on the fed funds is not true. it's out there in a lot of stuff. they may stop here. >> rich bernstein -- >> i want to ask both of you. do you think fed funds december 31, 2010 will be higher than they are today? >> well, let me answer that question and put it back to you. the typical forecast, is that the unemployment rate will be 9.5% or higher. also, that the inflation rate over the last year will be 1 to 1.25%. i have to ask you if you think at that point the fed would begin to tighten? you tell me. >> first of all, i think the bond market will -- i don't think the bond market looks at core. i hate to argue with on you this one, but if we find the inflation rate starts breaking 3, 3.5, we break
't you tell us what you think after hearing a couple days of bernanke's testimony on the hill. does it change your outlook on what the fed is doing? >> no, as long as they use the magic words, extended period, we know the fed will be on hold for at least six months. that's what bill dudley told us. he said extended period was the language the fed has put in the policy statement, means at least six months. it was a phrase repeated by st. louis fed president bullard recently. so whenever bernanke puts his word in on it as well, we can feel assured that the fed is not likely to move for at least six months. the fed needs to be very clear at this day and age. so if they're telling us that that's what extended period means, that's what it means. and so, until there's some other clarifying comments, that's what we have to go on. >> we had somebody who told us yesterday that maybe they could move 25, 50 basis points. it's not the extended period but they're focusing on the incredibly low rates. either one of you guys quily think that's the case? >> the focus is on the extraordinary program
, you have three big concerns. bernanke's confirmation, slowing china growth and obama slapping the banks around in the aftermath of the massachusetts miracle. i think investors have really focused upon those things and have used those skuexcuses to t profit. >> you don't seem to think things are over. we're due for a pullback and maybe the bull market continues? >> you look at fourth quarter earnings right now and i guess we're about halfway through the season. two-thirds of the company have beaten on revenues. you have consensus earnings for s&p that have now moved up to $76 a share. that puts multiple of a 14 times forward earnings. you have core inflation below 2% year over year. 3.6% treasury yield. multiples are too low. you'll see more corporate earnings improvements and stocks will go higher. >> massachusetts miracle? massachusetts disaster maybe. massachusetts tragedy maybe. >> depends on your point of view. >> i guess it does. i want to get that other side in. >> why are you looking at me? phil is the guest. >> i'm sorry. >> jay, what do you think of that scenario? thi
. >>> meanwhile, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke on the hill today as well, responding to a news article that goldman sachs and other major investment banks were shorting the very greek debt that they were helping the country issue. senior economics reporter steve liesman now with that story. >> reporter: maria, thanks. fed chairman ben bernanke said that the fed is examining the actions of goldman sachs and other banks surrounding two issues. first, whether the bank helped sell debt that essentially allowed greece to disguise the true amount of its debt, and second, whether it was appropriate for them to be essentially shorting that debt through the derivatives known as credit default swaps. >> we are looking into a number of questions relating to goldman sachs and other companies and in their derivative's arrangements with greece, and on this issue as well. as you know credit default swaps are properly used as hedging instruments -- >> i agree. >> we, the s.e.c., of course, has been interested in this issue. obviously, using these instruments in a way that intentionally destabilizes a
was widely expected. ben bernanke came out last week saying a hike was coming, but many economists thought that the fed would at least wait until the next policy meeting next month. and in its statement, the fed says that the economic outlook does remain the same, reiterating that the benchmark rate will sustain for a period and that was echoed by the atlanta fed president, st. louis fed president and fed funds futures are pricing in a 25% chance of a rate hike by the end of the year. checking shares of u.s. bank in frankfurt, down across the board with citi lower, 1.4%. morgan stanley down 2.7%. ross. >> yeah. meanwhile, nicole, european stock markets ahead of the u.s. open, they've short of taken it mostly in their stride. we've had a sunny bit of green on the board this morning. we've dipped down slightly, off about .25% for the ftse 100. a little more for the german and french markets. smi, as we heard earlier, really good numbers from nestle, talking about growth in asia, so doing all the sort of things that james bev aan next to me likes. and the dollar has come off the highs on the
bernanke and the possibility of raising interest rates. or effectively raising interest rates. that is today's street poll. not long ago, this man had limited mobility. last month, this woman wasn't even able to get around inside of her own home. they chose mobility. and they chose the scooter store! if you or a loved one live with limited mobility call the scooter store! no other company will work harder to make you mobile or do more to guarantee your complete satisfaction. if we pre-qualify you for a new power chair or scooter and your claim isn't approved, the scooter store will give you your power chair or scooter free. that's our guarantee. they were so helpful and nice. they filed all the paperwork, and medicare and my insurance covered the cost. we can work directly with medicare or with your insurance company. we can even help with financing. if there's a way, we'll find it! so don't wait any longer, call the scooter store today. >>> as america slowly recovers from the recession many investors have been looking to china, the country's economy is in the middle of a huge
said that means henry paulson, tim geithner, and ben bernanke are the dentists. >> let me tell you. i felt like i was having a root canal. >> without anesthesia. >> i was a dentist having a root canal without anesthesia at the same time. but there's a saying in the book on -- my book "on the brink," and this was a day or two before we were going to need to step in and rescue citigroup. and what really hit me was that i was forever going to be associated with these bailouts, and it would be the secretary treasure that did all these interventions. i said that will be the good news. the bad news will be if we can't cobble something that works for citigroup and if it goes down i'll be the secretary treasurer that pre sides over night great recession. >> back with david gergen and diane brady. the reason we have you guys on is because you're honest about this. think henry paulson had it right on there. there's a whole lot of revisionist history going on at capitol hill. diane and david, we were all together during that time, and it seemed like the right thing to do to a lot of people who a
me, i'm chaled. >> and what are you expecting to hear from bernanke on capitol hill tomorrow? you say restraint is needed. why and when? >> well, you know, the reason i think that restraint is needed is because i think that he may be getting a little bit behind the curve. the reason i say that is a lot of the so-called leading indicators of inflation, my work, suggested inflation in 2010 is going to be higher than the consensus expectation. so the consensus expects inflation to be around 2%. i think it could be over 3% in 2010. and i think bernanke needs to start move towards restraint, in other words, start to move towards some of the excess liquidity driving this inflation. so i think sooner as opposed to later. i actually think that if he starts to move towards restraint wibt might lead to an increase in bank lending, which is sorely acting. but nevertheless, i think he needs to move towards restraint sooner than the consensus believes, not later. >> that's what i wanted to ask you about. we're getting comments in from the fed's bill dudley who says small banks are fuelling the pre
. and with dr. bernanke scheduled to speak tomorrow, our sense is that that trade will be relatively quiet here. a high volume area last week was around 1064 even. we'll probably bing bong back and forth on that trade waiting for dr. bernanke or for further developments in europe. >> what's your view, jamie, about today's trade and whether you believe in the bounce we are likely to get, at least at the open? >> well, i think the most encouraging part is that this rally is coming from european financials. you can see all those works up markedly on yesterday's trade. domestically, local ibs have been overwhelmed by this european crisis. unemployment was a great number on friday. it exceeded expectations. earnings continue to be strong. we seem to have been weighed down by euro. if that turn around and those financials continue to hold these gains, it could be very good things domestically. >> jamie, most of the guys you trade with trade according to technical analysis charts and yada yada. let me run this by you. the day before yesterday, which was a monday, right? yeah. did monday look like a sh
, ben bernanke's green chutes. while arc gres everyboggressive green chutes. welcome to our program. i'm erin burnett. here is the conundrum. stocks seem happy lately. a few days of rallies. we've got new, unproven companies pulling deals, not able to raise money to grow and hire. big companies who can raise money aren't seeming to spend it on grow and hiring. china is a little bit angry at america. you're looking at a picture now
like the saints have it for a second. >> the guest host is inside the bernanke huddle during the financial crisis, former fed governor randy kroszner. >>> a big play here, a big play there, and the bulls may be ready to run. >> picked off. look out. just passed manning and tracy porter taking the ball all the way. touchdown, new orleans! >> "squawk box" begins right now. ♪ ♪ >>> good morning, everybody. welcome back to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with steve liesman, carl and joe are out but in studio we also have new york times reporter andrew ross sorkin. our guest host, randy kroszner, a business professor at the booth school of business. great to have you here, randy. >> great to see you. >> we have a lot to talk to you about this morning. let's go to your morning rundown. we have a game plan with howard ward, portfolio manager for gamco investors growth fund. then we'll see if we can diffuse the debt bomb that threatens the global market. it's a small problem we'll try to fix this morning. later we'll be monday morning quarterbacking the super bow
concerns that the market has across the spectrum. and you've got bernanke talking about higher rates. fed funds are pricing in almost 100% probability that we have rates lower in march. if we start to see more rhetoric out of the fed with respect to what they're going to do with the rates, that is outside of market expectations right now currently. >> what are you telling people tow to do snt. >> right now, volt tilt is at a level to finance shorter purchases and hedges. given the uncertainty, i don't think it's fair to say that volatility is expensive on the front end. >> anthony, real quick, berna e bernanke's exit strategy speech yesterday, does it move up your sense of the timing for when the fed will ultimately tighten? >> it really didn't, steve. the federal reserve basically injected $1.5 trillion in the liquidity in the credit crisis. it would be irresponsibility of the fed to not outline a credit strategy. i think he made it very clear that he wanted to give us the thumb nails strategy of what this is going to be like. is he going to normalize the discount rate? yes. but remembe
. people still point to may of '07 when bernanke says subprime is 9% of mortgages, right? they're not infallible. and we can't expect them to be, i guess, is the answer, right? >> none of us is infallible. if you didn't learn that, you missed something over the course of the past three years. >> dan's with us for the rest of the program. we've got a lot more to talk about. >>> meantime, any questions or comments this morning, we'd love to hear from you. our address is squawk@cnbc.com. >>> when we come back, european exposure, debt crisis overseas, how some u.s. companies might be impacted. >>> still to come, olympic skiers headed to the starting gate at whistler while bankers in new york await a possible auction. we'll get an update from daniel nu mudd, the ceo of fortress, just ahead. >>> time now for today's "aflac trivia question." what baseball player nicknamed the georgia peach amassed 4,189 hits in his career? this is not more benefits at greater cost to your company insurance. this is not how does it fit in my company's budget insurance. this is help protect and care for
and bernanke. cisco's numbers come right at the close. >>> visa is also reporting quarterly numbers after the bell. in today's fast money final call we'll tell you how to take your position on that. fast money contributor joining us now. good to see you. >> great to be with you, judge. >> got to be quick here. what are you expecting from visa after the bell? >> as it trades down to the lows of the day like you and maria have been saying, a lot of financial stocks. >> both down today. >> visa's got earnings after the bell today. i'm bullish on that because of unusual call buying and that's right after the bell. 91 cents. and/or positive guidance, that's what we're looking for. master, tomorrow morning, before the market opens and we don't have any reading on that one. but i am long visa. >> is visa, part of it is that the debit card business continues to do well. as people are perhaps charging less and going to the debit card? >> you bet. as well as the sheer transactions, because these guys are just a through-put, they're not taking the risk on the other side of the trade. so regardless o
velshi later today. >> a lot of great stuff. >> ben bernanke will testify on the hill today. >> we'll get his prescription or a forecast on what will happen with the overall economy. a lot of questions. when will this economy be back to normal and what is normal? that means your job, home and bank. let's take a look at where we stand. the national association of business economics predicts job growth is on its way, forecasting 140,000 jobs per month will be added in 2010. in the new normal, no thing is ever as it seems. yesterday we found out mass layoffs rose last month for the first time since august. more than 180,000 folks fell victim to mass layoffs in january. we saw consumer confidence tumble. consumers are still very nervous. how about your house? your biggest asset most likely or what was once your biggest asset. one out of every four mortgages is under water. it means you owe more than the house is worth. foreclosure will continue. speaking of lenders, banks still in trouble. one out of 11 banks is at risk of going under. that's the problem bank lift, 140 banks were shut down la
, 50 basis points or 100 basis points would be out of whack. >> did you see bernanke's swearing-in? >> i didn't.he president wasn't? >> how do you talk about transparency when you have a private swearing-in ceremony in apparently there is no legal standing for the swearing-in ceremony, because he was approved while he was still chairman. if the chairmanship expired, there would need to be a -- >> why would you need to see someone sworn in? you think he's actually going to swear? >> typically a president or a top official at some time -- >> but transparency, though. >> the most public fight over a fed chairman. >> the ceremonyial way. >> it's not a legal thing. >> you want him to answer questions that you pose him, you don't want to see the ceremony of someone swearing in, how did he look, what was his expression? was he worried? >> does it help he was in matter? >> i don't think it matters. >> this isn't what transparency was watched. i want to have watched it. i wouldn't have taken time out of my day to watch it. >> it shows you what a nerd you are. >> i don't want to be surpri
word that ben bernanke is set to testify. >> i'm sue herera. there are some bright spots. travelers, at&t, walmart and dupont are among the dow's 30 winners. >> ppl beat the street. the ceo will join us first on cnbc. tyson foods smashing analysts' estimates. ate na pushing higher. we should get to the market. >> i'm dennis neil. let's get straight to this market action. let's go to bob pisani. >> here's a couple of headlines here. stocks close in europe at 1130, the stock market droops here. the second time in a row. guys in europe are getting concerned. they want to lighten up. second thing that happened that's important here, is dollarle rallied at the exact same moment we had yesterday. of course, what happens when that happens? it puts pressure on commodities and puts pressure on commodity stocks. all the big names in energy and the material groups on the weak side. and sharon, we saw a heck of a lot of contracts traded in oil in the last hour and a half. >> that's right. over 400,000 contracts traded today, bob, and this is the second straight day of massive contracts and massive
for the u.s. in 2 1/2 years at around 0.5%. and looking at what bernanke said this week, gave us a laundry list of ways to exit the strategy, basically, and he basically talked about, you know, the possibility of increasing interests on bank reserves. and while in basically contrast, the ecb is not going to do the exit strategy. it's going to stay in and maybe in too deep right now as it may need to provide some liquidity out of what happened from greece. so that will definitely give the yield luster for the u.s. dollar. >> so what target would you put on euro/dollar? >> still looking at 1.32% before the end of the quarter. any bounce, really, is going to be more of the corrective bounce, not more than 1.3950. >> i was wondering, what do you see the likelihood of a new and increased quantitative easing effort by the ecb, either in a direct like we've seen in the u.s. or uk and a continuation of the currency? >> look, even though they said they are not going to provide renewed 12-month loan facility, the ecb, this institution that has been seen as one of the first institutions to get out of
together with bernanke's exit speech, you put that together and people say, wait a second, maybe the tight is turning. and being on top of the timing of when the fed starts to tighten or when the rhetoric changes, because when the rhetoric changes, that's when rates will change. and if there weren't enough international news, the european central bank plans to join forces of the european commission to monitor the situation in greece. ecb president jean-claude trichet says the two will draw up necessary measures to maintain stability in the euro zone. european officials offered support for debt-laden greece at a summit yesterday. we don't know what's in the plan. it's some sort of support. >> i don't know what the plan is. except everybody is happy they're in a plan. >> they're in something. they've expressed support. >> monday, the finance ministers meet again. this may be a situation where you see more of the details that start to emerge. what's it call, the european -- the meeting on monday. >> what worries me is that the plan itself will be so underwell manying that people will say, is
it on the bernanke excuse stroke reason. we saw it in particular on heavy volume last friday and this is not really -- is this not really a market where really the chick ents are coming home to roost, bid up on a lot of artificial liquidity and is systematically now deleveraging? >> i tend to agree long term i'm very bullish. we have been through a tremendous recession worldwide and now we're just seeing reel it budding stages of a new economic expansion. we're not out of the woods yet but a lot better than six months ago. >> i'm not sure you can agree with me and be bullish. if you have systematic deleveraging this market is going to go down and down surely if that is true. >> i don't really think that the market -- >> surely if that is the reasoning then this is not good news for sometime. >> well, again, we view the world from a financial planning perspective. if you're a trader, you've got this risk on, then you're at risk with short-term money. long-term money viewing from a financial planning perspective, we've been building cash, we've been defensive for quite a while, and our main goal with
bernanke is in, senator. >> yes, he is. >> that's all right with you, though. you're going to be okay, right? >> i'm going to be okay. i offer my congratulations. but i think it does accepted a message to be confirmed by the lowest margin in history, sends a message about the concern about the role he played and the build-up to the crisis. >> yeah, but senator, you were ready to take the other side, knowing he would get confirmed, and your constituents can still say, well, at least this senator took the populus side. took the. >> i took the position as the only democrat taking that position after a careful review of the things he stood for, alignment with greenspan, failure to resfond derivatives. the failure on consumer protection, the things you are talking about in terms of prepayment penalties and liar loans and so i think he failed on many fronts but he is there now and i hope he does a great job on monetary policy and gets consumer protection in an agency that will care about it. >> senator, thanks. you have to keep coming back. >> thank you. >> oregon, oregon. i know how to say
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